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the san francisco civil rights ordinance. i am tiny [inaudible] and my comments are on behalf for a safe san francisco. as you know the coalition worked to address accountability and transparency and san francisco police department relationship with federal counter terrorism agencies and one that we worked on is within the san francisco police department between the federal bureau of investigation in the joint task force. as part of that relationship sfpd entered into a secret agreement with the fbi that did away with decades of progress in san francisco. members of this coalition have worked with supervisor jane kim's office to pass this ordinance and make sure that local and state standards apply and requires transparency in the process and that the chief issue a report on the mission by them. this was supported by civil rights organizations, community and bar organizations. it was passed unanimously by the board of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're ailsd with the
in the civil rights movement when i was in my teens and 20s. i met dr. martin luther king jr. i was doing a play called fly black bird about the civil rights movement. i was a young student activist in that musical. and we sang at a civil rights rally where dr. king spoke. and after that -- rally we had a private meeting with dr. king, and i'll never forget that moment when i shook his hand. we are working on this altogether, whether it is civil rights for african-americans, or equality for women or equality for the lgbt community. >> we're out of time, i learn something amazing about george takei, he met dr. martin luther king jr., thank you for telling us that story. you get tonight's last word. thank you, george. >>> hillary kicks butt. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. secretary of state hillary clinton was at her best today appearing between both senate and house committees on foreign affairs. she showed acuity, humility, and charm. she showed candor and humility in place of the state department handling of
conservatives are even trying to co-opt the civil rights movement itself. to advance their right wing agenda on everything from guns to women's health. >> the modern equivalence of the civil rights act is that you people defending and loyal to the second amendment are not the bull connors, you're the martin luther kings. you're the people matching at selma. you're having your civil rights denied. >> the government doesn't have a role in contraception. government does have a role in protecting your civil rights. especially today, on martin luther king day. >> i think martin luther king would agree with me if he were alive today that if african americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. >> two misquote leaders and figures that fought for freedom and inequality is dishonest. to misuse them is disgraceful. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> hillary kicks butt. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me s
do we do with our civil liberty rights? and what do we do with our troop levels? there are a lot of issues that could have divided us and we had the type of debate that i think was in the best interest of the united states senate and cleated that bill in -- and we completed that bill in a timely way. i think the way the two of you were able to come forward, there are a lot of other committees -- i serve on the senate foreign relations committee, we talked today during -- yesterday during -- and senator mccain you're also on that committee -- we talked to secretary clinton. wouldn't it be nice to get a state department authorization bill on the floor of the united states senate? mr. mccain: it's a disgrace that we haven't, in how many years? mr. cardin: it's been a long tievmentime. i haven't been in the senate since that happened. we have a better opportunity now. if our committee can mark up a defense authorization -- maybe it'll take a week or two, and you're right, maybe we'll have to work on friday, saturday, over the weekend to get it done. we should do that. but we now have
. and as it happened -- and i was involved in the civil rights movement when i was in my teens and 20s. i met dr. martin luther king jr. i was doing a play called fly black bird about the civil rights movement. i was a young student activist in that musical. and we sang at a civil rights rally where dr. king spoke. and after that, reca -- rally wa private meeting with dr. king, and i'll never forget that moment when i shook his hand. we are working >> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. any time republicans try to beat up on a clinton, it's always great tv, especially when they get whopped like they did today. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> for me, this is not just a matter of policy, it's personal. >> secretary of state hillary clinton rips open the right wing attack on benghazi. >> the fact is we had four dead americans. >> and knocks down hack -- >> because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night decided they would go kill some americans. >> -- after hack -- >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to f
democrat senator and long-time civil rights leader henry marsh left town on martin luther king day to attend president obama's inauguration. [audience reacts] how fitting. in the words of dr. king, "i have been to the mountaintop, and while i was there, they heavily redistricted the promised land." [ laughter ] but the way these good ol' alpha dogs really swung their sacks in the faces of black voters was that after this vote on martin luther king day they "adjourned in memory of confederate general stonewall jackson." [audience reacts] what better way to honor dr. king? because if it weren't for the confederacy, he wouldn't have had that much to do. [ laughter ] now the bill -- you're welcome. [ laughter ] now the bill still has to be signed by virginia governor bob mcdonnell, who said "obviously the tactics used yesterday were a surprise and i don't think that's the way business should be done," but he didn't promise to veto it, saying instead "if i get a bill, i'll deal with it at that time." >> stephen: yeah, game time decision. after all, if somebody offered me a panda-burger,
coming up that's going to explore the civil rights movement. from young artists and it's completely free. the opening for the civil rights show is going to be on wednesday at around 5:00, 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. >> all right. thank you so much. >> of course. >> and, of course, you can get more information, more ideas for your weekend. log on to nbcwashington.com or the going out guide on washingtonpost.com. keith? >>> let's take a look now at some of the stories we're following on news 4 this afternoon. coming up on "news 4 at 4:00," storm team 4 is all over the winter weather. stay with us for everything you need to know how to navigate the roads this evening. and also ahead at 4:00, sweet success, a chef from prince georges county hits the big time. pat lawson-muse introduces us to the woman whose sweet treats have landed her on the food network. and tonight at 5:00, a consumer warning from liz crenshaw. meet a woman whose credit was ruined by one bill she never received. we'll tell you how to avoid becoming the next victim. >>> and a look, a final look for today for midday, anyway at our we
party had similar positions or even cared about civil rights i think it was 14% of african-american voters said that they would be more likely to vote for the republican candidate. >> there are changes in this country that they can no longer deny, and that's why you have people like ralph reed coming out and saying we can't stick our head in the sand anymore, and you have -- there's supposedly winter convention going to have skype training and google hang-outs and -- >> i think google hang-outs sound great and skype training sounds great, but i go back to what pribus said. we have a message that we don't actually have to change our policy, right? if we have enough google hangs we can convince minority voters, gay voters that we're inclusive, and, yet, you have the president delivering a message to the country on monday which was about immigration, gay rights, as civil rights issue, and immigration. none of which should be controversial. >> i don't think he believes they have to change anywhere. i think many are willing to change on immigration. i think you'll find more and
as it relates to drug issues and how that's a civil rights concern and that book has taken off and inspired a lot of people and lead to the human rights commission's hearing that happened and i think as a commission we should definitely as uncomfortable and difficult this topic is we're not shying away from looking at it. we might have a different analysis but it's important to take that time so thank you. >> i want to be careful. our officers in san francisco are diverse. it's one of the most diverse in the country. we have training and occ does a mag 95-cent job looking at that and. >> >> making sure things are race thought ral and you have to be. >> >> careful when you throw things out there and our officers are the best in the business. i was speaking to officer monroe and the guy said -- >> he did that in the context of his work. >> his work. >> i got your back inspector. >> he made that distinction many times. >> right. >> put him out there in a muni uniform to buy them. we have to be careful and i love the work you're doing and work with us and don't lose that concern for the c
progressive vision for the country. civil rights. women's rights. voter rights. gay rights. but some have been trying to say beyonce's performance was the
of high school seniors scored proficient in areas including the u.s. constitution civil rights and the court system. >> we want to know do you think this is a good idea or if it's bad for students? send over your comments to us. tweet them to us at fox friends first or shoot us an e-mail at fox friend first@foxnews.com. we will read them later in the show. no u.s. constitution class for the kids. >> coming up on the rundown cheryl casone is here to help you get a job. she is lacking at three companies hiring this week. >> a truck driver never saw it coming a train slams into a tractor trailer. this crash has an amazing ending. we will show you the other . >> take a look at this, a seriously close call for this tractor trailer. surveillance footage capturing a train sideswiping this big rig. this driver said he was distracted an didn't see the train or the flashing lights. >> if going to the gym is one of your new year's resolution you are not alone. 12 percent of members join in january that's why gyms are hiring. many people ate and drank a lot of a couple of things about gold
're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions so you don't get to talk anymore. for the rest of the four panellests whoever keep its to two to three minute
's the critical part of it, right? when they dig in with their civil lawsuit they unearth more stuff as we found out today in the morgan stanley case. why didn't the government dig in? and let me pause at a theory for you and get your reaction to it. one, these guys give a tremendous amount of money to politicians. dick durban said frankly they own the place and he's the second more senior senator for the democrats in the senate. and they're all in the same circle. attorney general eric holder doesn't think waaaa i'm going to do deals that's my friend bob. i just represented him the other day. i'm not going to put bob in jail. >> there are a lot of political appointees. here eric holder and then lanny brewer chief of the criminal division of justice the man who sits at the crux of all this. there are a lot of justice attorneys who would love nothing more than to bring down a major banger, a major wall street player put a notch on their belt. that's a counter veiling to reality. you say without support from above it's hard for them to act and i think that's very likely true. on the other hand i t
. >>> the controversial plan to limit the size of sugary drinks has hit an unexpected new roadblock. two mayor civil right groups have gone to stop it. jeff glor, good morning. >> good morning to you. not many were surprised to see them oppose it but some were surprised when the spanish deck calculation and the naacp. they said they're doing it not because of race but because of economic fairness. new york city mayor michael bloomberg's plan would but a limit to 16-understand drink in restaurants, sports games, street carts, and movie theaters. it results in $4.7 billion in annual health care costs. 60% of which is paid by the city. >> our administration refuses to stand on the sidelines while millions of our fellow new yorkers struggle with the health implications of being overweight or obese. >> reporter: but the naacp says the mayor's approach is not right. >> the mayor sometime decided that an issue that is important to him should be just a this way or no hazel dukes is the presid. >> the decision is -- >> people can say what they want to. we are on the side of fairness. >> the lawsuit contents the su
functioning of our -- of our country. i mention in particular the long, long struggle for civil rights and how that was held up by a small minority which happened to be in my party, by the way, at that time. but nonetheless, the senate through the years has really been the chamber that takes a long and hard look at legislation, where we have the right to amend, where we have the right to discuss and to embark upon discourse on legislation in a manner that allows even the smallest state, the smallest state to be able to be represented as much as a large state. not true in the body that both the occupant of the chair and i used to serve in in the house because there, as you know, large states can dominate because they have got most of the members. but here, the senator from connecticut is just as important as a senator from california or a senator from iowa, or, let's see, what's the least popular state, wyoming, i think, maybe or alaska is equal to a senator from new york or florida or texas or cal. so this has been the great equalizing body. and so having served here for this time, i think i h
to the bloomberg bomb's soda ban. some civil rights group think it will hurt minority business owners. could it be the straw that break the nanny state back? or the straw that breaks the soda? back in moments. we'll tell you. so you say men are superior drivers? yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? [ voice of dennis ] silence. we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. >>> i'm bret baier this washington. the big story here, confirmation hearing for the president's pick as the new secretary of state with foreign policy hot spots around the world. only getting hotter. tonight on "special report,"
and you have a candidate who said i would do this day vote against the civil rights act. >> john: that was rand paul. i think rand paul is like rick santorum in that he's not running for president but for higher public speaking fees for the rest of his life. it will be hillary against chris christie, a new york senator against a new jersey governor. his views are opposite of most of america. we know over 70% favor abortion rights. chris christie does not. do you think people would realize even a guy they like can have policies they don't like or is charisma more important than ideology? >> is that a trick question? >> john: no, it's a very real question. look at george w. bush. >> we love charisma and we love politicians with swagger. he has done good things with new jersey. you drive through and it even smells better. >> john: who doubt, and who cannot cheer what he has done for sandy victims. >> and the police forces, they love him too. >> john: and we could use that tunnel to manhattan as well. >> to predict anything about what chris christie's bigger play is on the national s
is committed to civil rights and to the advancement of the 26th legislative district where show served. she is also a trail blader for african-american women in politics in prince george's county, maryland. she remains in critical condition. folks are praying for her recovery from annapolis to prince george's county. this woman is a legend. police are -- fire is still working to to try to figure out what caused the fire. it is not considered suspicious. reportic live in temple hills. >>> an usual in move in the murder trial of a former culpepper virginia police officer. tomorrow the jurors will be visiting the scene of is the shooting. daniel harmon wright is charged with shooting patricia cook as she drove away from a church parking lot. he claimed he acted in self-defense. today a witness, ann skyler testified she saw the shooting. she said the officer was never stuck in the car's window, never dragged, and never in the past of cook's jeep. >>> red light cameras do get drivers to stop at intersections. is the insurance institute for highway safety released a new stilledy. the report found
state senate. virginia republicans waited until this one particular democratic senator, a noted civil rights lawyer named henry marsh, they waited until senator marsh left town on monday for the day to go to the inauguration of president obama. virginia republicans had to wait until he was gone because the state senate is equally divided in virginia, 20 republicans and 20 democrats. but with henry marsh gone for the day, it's no longer an even divide, right? it's 20-19. with that advantage, republicans decided to spring on the senate and spring on the entire state a whole new set of redmaps. a whole new set of gerrymandered maps for the state, drafted to put republicans in charge in virginia effectively permanently. because they did it when henry marsh was away, republicans succeeded in this plan by one vote. in their stealth attack to change the maps. that one vote was the missing vote of the senator who had gone to the inauguration. that's how they started the week. now virginia republicans are moving on to the next part of it. they're moving on to the electoral college scheme part
. whether it's civil rights for african-americans or equality for women, or equality for the lgtb community. >> oh, my. he takes on the world and the internet in his new ebook, and he's going to join me live in the studio. you don't want to miss it. progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more... [ midwestern/chicago accent ] cheddar! yeah! 50 percent more [yodeling] yodel-ay-ee-oo. 50% more flash. [ southern accent ] 50 percent more taters. that's where tots come from. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. 50% more spy stuff. what's in your wallet? this car is too small. yeah. t
senator baker's story about how the civil rights bill of 1968 was passed. i have discussed this with the republican leader before. he knows that era as well or better than i do but there was a time when senator baker said he was centered since office the man who had the job as senator mcconnell now has, he was a republican leader then and he said he heard the telephone rang and there was more than one into the conversation but senator dirksen was saying no mr. present i cannot come down and have an drink with you. i did that last night and -- is very unhappy with me. that was a conversation but 30 minutes later there was a rustle in the outer office in the republican leader's office the very office that senator mcconnell now holds and two beagles followed by the present united states came in and lyndon johnson the presence of their puppy and leader if you want have a drink with me i am down here to have one with you and they disappeared into the backroom for 45 minutes. the point of all that is not their socializing. the point was it was then that republican leaders offic
by force. so how dangerous are its threats? and why is the country's largest civil rights organization fighting new york's efforts to crack down on supersized soft drinks? we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." american men and women already are fighting and dying together overseas. the defense secretary leon panetta said today it's time for the military to recognize that reality. so the pentagon has ended its long-time policy of barring women from combat. critics question whether women can handle the grueling, physical tasks that come with those roles. chris lawrence has been looking into this for us. what's the latest, wolf? >> when it comes to integrating women, forget about privacy concerns. sleeping in close quarters, separate bathrooms, never mind that. it's strength and stamina. with a stroke of his pen, defense secretary leon panetta altered the look of the american sword. >> not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> panetta officially open
an unexpected new roadblock. two major civil rights groups have gone to court to stop it. jeff glor is here with the story. >> not many were surprised to see the american beverage association oppose this limit on sugary drinks but some were surprised when the hispanic federation and the naacp joined. the obesity epidemic is most acute in african-american and hispanic neighborhoods. the naacp told us they're doing this not because of race but because of economic fairness. new york city mayor michael bloomberg's plan approved by the board of health in september would put a 16 ounce limit on sugary drinks sold at restaurants, sports games, street carts and movie theaters. it's just one of his responses to the city's 24% obesity rate which result in $4.7 billion in annual health care cost 60% of which is paid by the city. >> our administration refuses to stand on the sidelines while millions of our fellow new yorkans struggle with the health implications of being overweight or obese. >> reporter: but the naacp says the mayor's approach is not right. >> the mayor sometimes
. housing, they are discriminated against. a lot is almost a civil rights issue. it is a human rights issue. i am hoping integration helps that. families are torn apart by it. i am fortunate to have had a very fortunate family. the stress and strain economically will bust up families. you are right on it. think -- thank you for your acknowledgement. >> i think it is interesting families would not hesitate to get a family matter cannot -- family member help for appendicitis or any other problem but often have a difficult time reaching out to get the behavioral health and the substance seized disorder treatment they need. the bottom line is it is often seen that you have a character problem or a bad mom or dad or something along those lines, rather than, for many people, if they have a brain disease. there is a lot of education still to come and a lot of support we need at several levels for people to be able to move forward and raise their hand and come out and get help. i can also say we need to stick our head up and be proud of the fact that the area of health care we provide care in and w
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
to stonewall in such a clear and simple phrase he captured the struggle of some many of us, the civil rights challenge of so many of us. we need to engage in the conversation. host: what do you expect from the congress in this area? guest: much has happened in the congress. out efforts were mostly about blocking bad things from happening. we did that in the early 2000's. i see parallels with reducing gun violence with marriage equality and support for the gay and lesbian community. we see support from republicans for marriage equality and support from democrats. continued efforts to pass the respect for marriage act, which would get rid of the defense for marriage act. i see the courts -- the supreme court is taking up marriage equality. they will be heard in march with a decision heard in june. there has been a shift in public attitudes, just as i see a shift on reducing gun violence. host: good morning. caller: i watch the news a lot and i see the shootings and the mass shootings are committed by the mentally ill. i have a son and i see this and my son. no gun control law would control him
with reaction. a lot of women are saying it's with about time. >> reporter: that's right. four women along with the american civil liberties union, the aclu, sued the government over this ban. when the announcement came today they were shocked to hear the news. it is a policy change that could be life changing. >> pictures of me parachuting. >> reporter: in the eight years susan served in the u.s. air force, all but one of her dreams came true. that dream was a combat job from which women were banned. >> there are women who are extremely strong and have the ability and the skills they need to do well in this job. and to hold them back because of a stereotype is wrong. >> reporter: she now runs academy women, a support site dedicated to military women with 10,000 members. she says the ban often comes up. four women along with the national aclu and the northern california aclu chapters sued the government to overturn the ban. the announcement was a shock. >> the combat exclusion policy, one of the last vestiges of discrimination against women just because we're women. >> reporter: when the s
. the church of scientology was founded in 1954. its stated goals to help people "live in a civilization without insanity, without criminals and without war where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights." members paid to take courses designed to help them work through issues of their past and reach a higher state of consciousne consciousness. church members are tested with a device that is used to monitor their feelings and reactions. hubbard died in 1986 and since then this man has been the leader. he, like hubbard before him, oversees a religious order inside the church. an order that is responsible for church management. members sometimes wear naval style uniforms and dedicate their life to the church promises to remain in the church for reincarnated lives to come. it claims that 10 million members worldwide, 6 million in the u.s. in 2009, then church spokesman tommy davis put it this way. >> he's responsible for the current renaissance the church is experiencing and the church has doubled in size in the last five years and flourished under his leadership. >> according
on the civil side and used to apply under the a.l.i. test and now we have a new distribution of being able to distinguish right from wrong. so now we have two completely different distributions that we're drawing that bright line on. >> competent versus volitional. we can decide that cognitive isn't sufficient, but it is the basis where we draw the line. sorry. >> ok. so to get back to the science, do you see how the research that you're doing and this imaging and identification of areas in the brain that may be part of primarily psychopathy which we're talking about today, how would that be used in the courtroom? what is your opinion? >> classically individuals who have those trades, the lack of empathy, those traits predict future recidivism. if you're an offender and scored very high on those traits, you have a four to eight times increased risk of reoffending when released if you're an inmate. it is an construct on a future dangerness issue and used in risk assessment. the literature has done, it has helped us to understand that there are, that since the brains are very different, they
civil commitment. >> professor. >> i'm going to add, do this a little bit shorter, i think, which is let's start with a question to everybody in the audience. all right, so if you like chocolate cake, raise your left hand. if you do not like chocolate cake, raise your right hand. all people who like chocolate cake left hand, don't like chocolate cake right hand. all right, hands down. how many people found it difficult to raise your hand by yourself? not very many. great, you made a choice. you thought about it. you decided and you acted. and my concept of what free will is the ability to act consistent with your preferences and desires. just that simple. now how many people here feel like you have control over whether or not you like chocolate cake? raise either hands. fewer, right. so there are two different things going on that we often conflate when we talk about free will. one is your predispositions to preferences and desires, ok. that may be impulsivity, that may be violence, that may be anti-social personality disorder, that may be a preference for chocolate cake, a preference fo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 60 (some duplicates have been removed)